Q&A: Green New Year’s Resolution Ideas with Alexandra Zissu

Question:

Alexandra,

New Year’s is here and I’m looking for simple ways to green my life. Do you have some ideas?

Thanks,

Ron

Answer:

Hi Ron,

Happy almost New Year! I’m glad to hear about the changes you want to make for 2013. Simple steps add up, especially if we all take them. One easy way to go green is via the food you buy, cook, and eat. In my book The Conscious Kitchen, I have ten food commandments I suggest. Perhaps you will find resolution ideas in them.

1. Eat less meat. When eating beef, seek out and choose grass-fed. Other meat and poultry should be carefully sourced.

2. Just say no to bottled water. Drink (filtered) tap instead. This will save money, too.

3. Buy local organic or sustainably farmed fruits and vegetables. Don’t forget that coffee and tea come from plants, and wine is made from grapes; choose sustainable versions.

4. Eat only the least contaminated sustainably harvested wild or well-sourced farmed seafood.

5. Always consider packaging when shopping. Choose items packed in materials you can reuse or that can be recycled in your municipality. Buy bulk items instead of overpackaged goods. Always shop with reusable bags.

6. Cook at home. Often. And serve on reusable dishware, not disposable. Clean with eco-friendly products.

7. Avoid plastic as often as you can.

8. Try composting, even if you live in a city, or a house without a yard.

9. Whenever possible, reduce energy use in the kitchen by choosing efficient appliances, cooking methods, and dishwashing practices; don’t leave appliances plugged in when not in use; ask your electric company for alternative energy sources like wind power.

10. Spread the word. Educate everyone you know. Green your office kitchen, your kids’ school kitchen, your friends and relatives’ kitchens. Make noise; together we can make a huge difference.

Happy 2013!

Alexandra

About Alexandra Zissu

Alexandra is an eco-lifestyle expert, writer, speaker, and consultant who has done wonders to translate environmental health issues into simple language and to bring awareness to the benefits of green and healthy living. She’s the co-author of The Complete Organic Pregnancy (2006), author of The Conscious Kitchen (2010)—a Books for a Better Life Awards finalist—and co-author of Planet Home (2010), and The Butcher’s Guide to Well-Raised Meat. She is currently editorial director for PracticallyGreen.com and has worked for New York Magazine, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Lifetime and Details magazines, The New York Observer, and Women’s Wear Daily.

Over the past decade, her stories have also appeared in The New York Times, The Green Guide, Plenty, Cookie, TheDailyGreen.com, Bon Appetit, Health, Vogue, Teen Vogue, Self, Child, Time Out New York, Harper’s Bazaar, and The Huffington Post, among other publications.

She speaks often about all things eco-friendly at private firms, mothers’ groups, schools, non-profits, and industry expos, and consults about green living for individuals and organizations. Though she should probably be on a biodynamic farm in Vermont, or growing dill in Finland, she actually lives in New York City, across the street from where she grew up, with her (organic) family.

*Post reprinted from http://www.alexandrazissu.com/az-blog/2012/12/26/qa-years-resolution/*

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